Musings, Jottings and Stray Thoughts

I’m not sure I have the ego to blog, since I don’t think most of my ideas are that original or important, but my publisher says I must, so I’ll give it a try.  I think I’ll play with this though.  Every so often I come across things I find funny and have to throw in my 2 cents, other times I get asked questions about writing which I try to answer as truthfully as I can.  So here goes – DocTom’s Blog (you can read the title at the top of the page!).

Post 24. Character Development – Keeping Notes.

Post 23. Characterization. Time to think about your characters.

Post 22. Writers, Some Things NOT to do. Part 3. The writing may be okay, but the story gets rejected. Here’s one more reason.

Post 21. Writers, Some things NOT to do. Part 2.  Here’s another reason stories get rejected – not doing your homework!

Post 20. Writers, Some Things NOT To Do. Part 1.  Ever wonder why so many stories get rejected?  Here’s one reason.

Post 19. Hamlet, Instructor of Writing.  What if Shakespeare had been a college professor?  This one’s a Holiday gift to all those poor line editors and writing teachers out there. I share your pain!

Post 18. Bending and Breaking the Rules or the Nine (?) Lives of Glenn   Bending the rules can hurt your story. Breaking them can kill it!

Post 17. World Building – Consistent Rules Rule!  When building a world you have to have rules – and stick to them.

Post 16. Feedback on Your Work – Part 2. Receiving.  Getting feedback can hurt, but how to take it is among the most important things a writer must learn.

Post 15. Feedback on Your Work – Part 1. Giving. It’s really difficult getting criticism.  But if you learn how to give thoughtful, helpful criticism first, receiving it becomes much easier.

Post 14. The First Draft Thing – Part 2. Things you should do with that first draft.

Post 13. The First Draft Thing – Part 1. Important things not to do when you finish that first draft.

Post 12. What’s it like writing a novel? Part 4. Your character as a part of World Building. When putting together the world of you novel don’t forget to use your characters as a part of your build! (Go to post).

Post 11. What’s it like writing a novel? Part 3. Originality – creating a scene, or a world. Try to make things different – but with a point. (Go to post).

Post 10. Thoughts about Writing – Great Books/Originality Part 2.  So what makes a book “great” or at least “classic”? (Go to Post).

Post 9. Bookkus or Book Country or Wattpad or… – What’s a Writer to do? Part 4.  Another option – let the readers decide. (Go to post). 

Post 8. Thoughts about Writing – Originality. Fan fiction is fun, but…. (Go to post).

Post 7.  Bookkus or Book Country or Wattpad or… – What’s a Writer to do? Part 3.  You’ve got some critical feedback, so how about sending the ms. to a publisher or posting it yourself? (Go to post).

Post 6. What’s it Like Writing a Novel. Part 2.  So what makes a book “great”? And is that what writers aim for? (Go to post).

Post 5. Bookkus or Book Country or Wattpad or… – What’s a Writer to do? Part 2.  Early draft? Consider posting to Book Country.  Critical feedback is what you need, and with luck this is where you’ll get it. (Go to post).

Post 4. Bookkus or Book Country or Wattpad or… – What’s a Writer to do? Part 1.  Where do you send your novel to be published? But more important is it really ready for prime time? (Go to post).

Post 3. WHEN IS “CRISPY” USED CORRECTLY?   This is a later response to the “things writers do that really bug you” thread.  The discussion had shifted to the misuse of words.  I decided to defend the poor writer. (Go to post).

  Post 2. WHAT’S IT LIKE TO WRITE A BOOK? Part 1.  So what do you get asked?  Where do you get your ideas?  How long did it take?  Why’d you do it?  If you’re interested, here’s the first installment. (Go to post).

 Post 1. STIG OF FLAFFENGLICKENSTEINBURG.  I know a really great  writer of weird short stories named Carl E. Reed through Book Country.  Other than being a really good writer, Carl has a knack for starting great discussions.  He posted one about things writers do that really bug him.  My response was to offer an excerpt from my nominee for the WORST Sword and Sorcery Fantasy ever written.  Take a look and tell me if you agree. (Go to post).

3 Comments

  1. Christine Pratt-Scanlon

    Post 1. Did James Patterson write that?

    Reply
  2. Chris

    I take back my earlier post: even when you’re purposefully writing drivel, it’s better than Patterson.

    Reply
    • tomwol5_wp

      Gee, with accolades like that can a Pulitzer be far behind?

      Reply

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